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Volume 10 Issue 5
January/February 2005

Canine Water Therapy:
A Healthy Dog is a Happy Dog

Carob: First Rate Food!

Adventures with Chi – Life Energy
Sound-making and Drawing

Flower Essences
A Natural Way to Relieve Emotional Imbalances

Why Am I Here? . . . Discovering Your Purpose

Editorial

Archives


Volume 10 Issue 5 — January/February 2005
Volume 10 Issue 5

Canine Water Therapy:
A Healthy Dog is a Happy Dog

by Kahlee Keane

Just short of two years ago Corinne and Darcy Deschambault lost Bailey, affectionately called Bay, their two-and-one-half-year-old golden retriever to cancer. During Bay’s short life he had several surgeries; veterinarians recommended swimming as the best therapy for his healing. Luckily, family friends offered their swimming pool for his frequent therapeutic exercise. Since both Corinne and Darcy are Registered Massage Therapists they were able to work with their pet in the water, as well as at home. “It worked wonders for him," says Corinne. So the seed had been firmly planted for what is now Saskatoon’s only canine aquatic centre, fittingly named Bay’s Waterpaws Canine Aquatic Center. The ultimate goal of the centre is to make hydrotherapy available so that dog owners can have a more active role in their pet's rehabilitation in a safe environment.

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Carob: First Rate Food!
by Paulette Millis

This food comes from the fleshy fruit pod of evergreen trees that reach heights of up to 50 feet. The carob tree, Certonia siliqua, also known as locust bean, locust pod, and St. John's Bread, grows well where water is scarce. They are found mainly in the Mediterranean, but have also been planted for shade purposes in southern California. The prolific pods, (they are legumes), are reddish-brown, 4 - 8 inches long, leathery on the outside and succulent and sweet on the inside. Carob powder is produced by grinding the pod after removal of the hard, brown seeds inside. This powder is the source of carob we usually see in whole food stores. It tastes somewhat like chocolate, is similar in many ways to cocoa, and health food enthusiasts and those who cannot eat chocolate use it as a substitute. I was introduced to it when my son became allergic to chocolate at age five, and continue to use it religiously instead of chocolate.

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Adventures with Chi – Life Energy
Sound-making and Drawing

by Kathleen Houston

I remember the first time I heard a Tibetan singing bowl. That sound awakened something inside of me, like a kinship that belonged in my repertoire of sound-making interests, to become a part of my creative process of art-making and healing work. I had no idea how that sound would change me and become a part of my life, or that I had to have a singing bowl before I left Montreal six years ago, or that I would do healing work with them, do visualizations and sound offerings, and be part of ritual or a creative process with my students. That moment was an invitation to something. Perhaps there are many moments like that in a life, when who you were before, and who you became after, are different. I became interested in chi – life energy. It is in me and in you, and in the environment, which for me was a great discovery about resonance. Oddly enough, chi is especially obvious with sound work. The practice of chi gong helped me connect sound-making and energy work with drawing, and also influenced my video work.

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Flower Essences
A Natural Way to Relieve Emotional Imbalances

by Rositha Jeanson

The first time I read about flower essences was in Richard Gerber’s book, Vibrational Medicine, New Choices for Healing Ourselves. In the chapter titled, “Learning to Heal with the Wisdom of Nature”, I read about Dr. Edward Bach and how he developed the flower essences that are used to treat emotional imbalances. They sounded too good to be true. I had always been interested in emotions and personalities and the connection between the mind and body and I thought if there was a natural way of dealing with emotions then I wanted to learn about it. I did some research on the internet and realized there are many essence makers in the world, but I particularly wanted to learn more about Dr. Bach. In my search I discovered the Bach Centre of England and learned that they also offered courses in Canada. Since then I have completed all three levels with the Bach Centre and I have never looked back.

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Why Am I Here? . . . Discovering Your Purpose
by Maureen McIntosh, B.Comm., MBA

I had been asking the wrong questions for years. How much money will I make if I do this? What is there a demand for in the marketplace? How will other people perceive me if I do this? How does society measure success? None of these questions led me in the direction of my deepest nature and, as you may guess, I was not particularly happy or fulfilled. The people in my life could not understand my discontent because I had it all, compared to society's measuring stick. Harold Whitman understood this truth when he said, “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive." How many people do you know who are truly alive? How many people do you know who can’t wait to get out of bed in the morning because they are passionate about their life?

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Editorial
by Melva Armstrong

Many blessings to you all as we enter this new year of 2005! I want to thank all our contributing writers, our print and Web site designers, our proofreader, our printer, our numerous advertisers, and all our readers for your wonderful support and work during the last year. Your combined contributions are what make WHOLifE Journal so extremely successful and for this I am truly grateful. I thoroughly enjoy putting the journal together each issue and I feel blessed because I get to meet and work with so many wonderful folks each and every day. I look forward to continuing on my path of growth and enlightenment as the journal's publisher and editor and I welcome all the gifts and challenges that will be presented to me along the way.
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Plus:

Our Issues are in Our Tissues – How is Our Inner World Creating Our Outer World?
Natural Reflections: Light Pollution: Is So Much Artificial Light Good?
News of Note

 

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