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Wholeness & Wellness Journal
of Saskatchewan Since 1995
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WHOLifE
Statement of Purpose


We believe in providing information on the abundant choices that are available in order to fulfill a healthy and whole lifestyle. We believe there is a need to maintain a connecting link among all those who have a common goal of good health and well-being. We believe that communication is a vital element in our community's growth and development. We know that the mind is unlimited in its potential and we thus encourage our readers to share their ideas and thoughts with us for the good of all.

Current Issue


Volume 27 Issue 1 — May/June 2021

The current issueBe a Medical Tourist in Your Own Backyard
by Sussanna Czeranko, ND

Medical tourism and the healing arts go hand in hand. And, they’re literally a stone’s throw away, right in our own backyard. We often associate medical tourist destinations with exotic, distant venues, complete with modern medical facilities and services including marvellous traditional spas.

Don’t forget, of course, the fine dining with wholesome, delicious food.

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Spring Greens – Spinach
by Stacey Tress

One of my favourite garden memories from when we lived in Yorkton, was when the snow had just melted and with just a little heat on the soil, the spinach would be up. It was always one of our first yard forages, along with baby dandelion greens and asparagus. Spinach is an annual crop here (although originating in the Middle East where wild varieties still grow today) and typically is a heavy seed producer. In the fall, I like to just leave a few of the spinach stalks intact so that it can self-seed for spring harvest.


Here, Look in the Garden Bed…
by Hélène Tremblay-Boyko

It is spring on the prairie. Plants and seeds that remained dormant in the dark, have now stirred below snow-covered gardens, and the prairie’s hardiest have emerged in glorious response to the sun’s warmth. Once more, we will have the opportunity to feast on fresh, seasonal, local produce. But why should this matter? Grocery stores have boasted fresh produce all winter long, coming from such exotic places as Chile, Guatemala, and New Zealand. Our diets are filled with a wide variety of fruits and vegetables coming from around the world. So why does it matter that Saskatchewan gardens and growers are once again able to offer seasonal alternatives?


Emotional Intelligence: The Ability to Know Ourselves and How to Interact With Others
by Joanne Fisher

Emotional intelligence is often abbreviated as EQ. It is our Emotional Quotient which measures our ability to understand one’s own emotions and is the attunement to emotions of others. Where IQ measures academic intelligence and the ability to learn new concepts, EQ is the ability to know ourselves and how to interact with others. This is a crucial skill for leadership, group collaboration, and ability to have successful relationships in general. It is now recognized that a strong EQ is a better predictor of success than IQ. EQ encompasses self awareness, self-regulation, internal motivation, empathy, and social skills.


Let’s Hold Hands and Space Together
by Sue Letwin

It’s been a year of trying to pivot in my home-based cannabis education business and I’m still working on it. There hasn’t been much support for these changing times. We are learning how to adapt while living through a restrictive, confusing period in history.


Rhythms of Wellbeing
by Jade :ll: Cathy Chicoine

As a drum circle facilitator, you might say that my thinking has always been a little “outside the box.” This non-traditional path drew me in twenty years ago when I witnessed the transformation of the participants at the community drum circles I attended, along with my own powerful sense of having lightened up each time, I was hooked.


What is Sho-Tai®?
by Wayne Fullawka

The art of Sho-Tai® is a method where practitioners touch acupuncture points on the body to determine where the body is weak. For instance, every organ or gland needs nutrition from the bowel and electricity from the brain to exist. When an organ or gland gets sick or worn out, it loses its electrical charge.


Challenges with Allergies
by Christine Wood

The number of Canadians with food allergies and those affected by pesticide residues and processing aids is on the rise. I’m sure we all know someone with a food allergy and have experienced what it’s like to be careful in preparing food for them or for ourselves, which isn’t always easy. Some of the most common food allergies in Canada include eggs, dairy, nuts, gluten, soy, corn, and shellfish. Symptoms can range from mild (sneezing and skin redness) to severe (including anaphylactic shock or death when not treated immediately).

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Editorial
by Melva Armstrong

We have come through the last blast of winter during spring. We are now looking to enjoy the return of the leaves on the trees and bushes, along with the flowers that we so dearly love. Many of you will already have been busy planting seedlings inside and are getting ready to put them in the ground. It’s the season that so many of us love to be able to grow our own food. Some will have their own garden and others will join community gardens, and some will have plants in pots on their balcony. Whatever the case may be, I wish you happy gardening.

Read the editorial


Plus:

Health Maintenance
Readings by Mariaja–Creating Your Future from Your Present
The Medicine for Now and All Times
News of Note



Recent Issues
26.4
26.4 - January/February 2021
26.3
26.3 - January/February 2021
26.2
26.2 - November/December 2020
26.1
26.1 - September/October 2020
25.6
25.6 - March/April 2020
25.5
25.5 - January/February 2020

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